Nana Star

Nana Star

An important part of raising our daughter is making sure that we select media that will reinforce good values that we are trying to impart to her. I received two wonderful books that fit that bill. I received the books Nana Star and Nana Star and the Moonman. I will review the Moonman book in another post. This post is about Nana Star.

Nana Star is the first book in a series about a young girl who finds a baby star that is lost. The heavens is where the star is from so the young girl must help the star get home. The star is looking for his nana and because the young girl takes up the task of helping the little star she becomes Nana Star. As Nana Star the young girl now has a very large responsibility. She sets off on her journey with the Little Star and that is the gist of what happens in book one.

Nana Star is a series that builds upon the lessons from each of the previous books. In book one, Nana Star we meet Nana Star and the little star. We see how this young girl learns quickly responsibility and caring for the needs of someone else. Nana Star also learns how to comfort someone else as she makes the little star feel safe. The story fits into a wider story that is filled with tales of lessons about values like manners, healthy habits, creativity and courage. In each book Nana Star meets another friend who can help her along her way to bring the little star to his home.

Each Nana Star book comes with a CD that contains a reading of the story along with an original song about Nana Star. The songs are different on each CD too. I’ve read about other bloggers and their children who like to listen to the CD and follow along in the book. I’m sure that when Eva gets older she will do that too. However, for now she likes looking at the beautiful illustrations.

When she gets a little older and can read she’ll surely point out the single mistake that is in each Nana Star Book. Yes, there is an intentional mistake in each Nana Star book. The reason for this is to remind people that we all make mistakes and even though mistakes are made something beautiful can be created. When you find the mistake you can send Nana Star a note with a correction and your child can be part of the Nana Star Little Twinkles Club. Being part of this club your child receives an 8 X 10 photo of the real Nana Star, Elizabeth Owens, and a special message from her.

The thing that really hooked me is that Nana Star is much more than a book with a nice message. Nana Star is a family collaboration. There are four generations working on the book and the Nana Star Foundation. The Nana Star Foundation is dedicated to helping make life easier for inner city school. It is also dedicated to terminally ill children. A portion of all sales of Nana Star books and merchandise goes to fund the foundation.

Read to Me Dad Ratings

  • Story – Excellent – Nana Star is a tale of responsibility, caring for others and sharing. A young girl finds a lost baby star and she takes on the responsibility of returning this scared star to his home. Along the way she meets many colorful characters that help her and guide her.
  • Re-Read-ability – Great. Because this book is part of a series it is easy to go back and re-read the start of the adventure.
  • Illustrations – Excellent – The colors and style of this book are simple yet look amazingly classic. Soft watercolors combined with ink gives this book a very unique look.
  • Message – Excellent – Caring for others is important.
  • Plot – Good – Nana Star is a nice story with a message but also it is episodic and each story builds on the next.
  • Characters – Whimsical. The watercolors and the magical nature of different characters gives the story a fun and whimsical feel.
  • Does Eva Like It – Eva does like looking at the pictures and I am sure that later this will be one of those books that she will read and re-read over and over.
  • Recommended Ages – All Ages will enjoy reading this story about caring and sharing.

Purchase your own Nana Star Books.

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